Please note that the show runs from Friday 29-Saturday 30 August and will not be open on Sunday 31 August as previously advertised.

Workshop timetable

Below is the timetable of workshops by the Society of Genealogists. These workshops are free to attend on the day on a first come, first served basis - tickets can be collected from the workshop ticket desks on the upstairs gallery.

However, should you wish to reserve a seat, you can pre-book a place when booking your ticket to the show at a cost of £2 each. You can book your ticket here.

Other workshops run at the show by Ancestry.co.uk, The Genealogists.co.uk and FamilyTreeDNA are non-ticketed, drop-in workshops. Full details will be available here.

Thursday February 20th, 2014

Time Celebrity theatre / S.O.G. studio 1 S.O.G. studio 2 S.O.G. studio 3 S.O.G. studio 4/ WWI ANCESTORS
10:15AM -
11:00AM
Celebrity Workshop - Natasha Kaplinsky Celebrity Workshop - Natasha Kaplinsky
Natasha Kaplinsky with Natasha Kaplinsky
Write Your Life Story

To complement all of your wonderful research, don’t forget to record what you already know about your own generation – and the generation or two above – before it’s too late. 

 
If the golden rule of genealogy is ‘Don’t forget to ask Granny’, make sure you don’t fall foul of that… especially if you are Granny or Grandpa, or if you want to encourage someone in your family to record what they know.
 
Mike’s fun, inspiring and interactive talk provides more than enough guidance for those looking to put pen to paper for future generations to enjoy
Write Your Life Story
Michael Oke

Michael Oke is author of bestselling books ‘Write Your Life Story’ and ‘Times of Our Lives’, both sponsored by The Daily Telegraph (30,000 copies sold).

Mike is the UK’s leading private biographer, having personally assisted with over 150 autobiographies, and his company with over 300. Mike’s team of 10 writing partners throughout the UK assist clients in the writing and recording of their family histories.
 
Mike’s work has been featured on BBC Radio 2, 4 and 5 as well as BBC2’s Dragons’ Den. 
As well as writing articles and giving regular talks, Mike is the UK co-ordinator of the Association of Personal Historians www.personalhistorians.org
with Michael Oke
The National Archives: Commemorating Conscription, 1916-1918: The papers of the Middlesex Military Service Appeal Tribunal.

In January 1916 Britain passed the first Military Service Act, enforcing compulsory military service on British society for the first time. Military Service Tribunals were established to hear applications for exemption from conscription based upon grounds of conscientious objection, employment reasons, business/domestic hardship and medical condition. Using the papers of the Middlesex Appeal Tribunal at The National Archives, this talk will examine the many different reasons for seeking exemption and the tensions created as a result of this move to compulsory service.

The National Archives: Commemorating Conscription, 1916-1918: The papers of the Middlesex Military Service Appeal Tribunal.
David Langrish

David Langrish joined the National Archives in the Summer of 2010, joining the Advice and Records Knowledge department as a Reader Advisor in April 2011. Prior to working at Kew, David completed a War Studies degree at the University of Kent, Canterbury.

with David Langrish
The Green Room Plaque ( Researching a memorial to 12 WWI Actors )

A bronze memorial plaque by F V Blundstone [Tyne Cot memorial sculptor] commemorating twelve actors from the Green Room Club, killed in WWI, appeared at auction.  Their theatrical and military careers were researched, using Family History techniques.  Some descendants provided photographs.  An insight into pre WWI  theatre, from Shakespeare to Musicals, in UK, and abroad.  Their service and deaths in the campaigns of WWI, from the Somme and Ypres, to Gallipoli, Salonica and Iraq – from infantry to RFC balloon officers.  With connections to Kipling, Queen Victoria, War Poets and the WW2 Dambusters. 

The Green Room Plaque ( Researching a memorial to 12 WWI Actors )
John Frearson

John Frearson is a retired construction materials consultant, turned family and company historian, researcher, lecturer and author.  He is a member of several Family History Societies and of the Guild of One Name Studies, studying the more than expected number of Frearson lines!  

This illustrated presentation has been given to the Leicester FHS [both in UK and Holland]; the Rugby FHG; and the Oxfordshire FHS.
with John Frearson
11:15AM -
12:00PM
Celebrity Workshop - Natasha Kaplinsky Celebrity Workshop - Natasha Kaplinsky
Natasha Kaplinsky with Natasha Kaplinsky
Beginner
Our Ancestors Homes: Where they lived and what their homes were like

Discover the main resources to find out where your ancestors lived. Find out which historical documents can be used to build up a picture of their homes inside and out; who owned and lived in it at different points in time and when, how and why it was built.

 
Our Ancestors Homes: Where they lived and what their homes were like
Gill Blanchard

Gill Blanchard, BA. MA. PGCE (PCE) has worked as a professional genealogist and house historian since 1992, including 6 years at Norfolk Record Office.  She is the author of Tracing Your East Anglian Ancestors (2009), Tracing Your House History (2013) and Writing Your Family History (due out 2014).

 
Gill is a qualified adult education tutor and has run numerous courses and workshops from beginners to post-graduate level since 1997. She teaches online courses for Pharos Tutors, including on the joint SoG certificate. Gill gives talks and presentations across the country, including WDYTYA?Live from 2010-2013.
with Gill Blanchard
How can I share and preserve memories in the digital era?

Today you have a lot of options to store and share your family history research. These include capturing tools (audio recorders, cameras, phones, and scanners), sharing devices (CD’s, DVD’s, portable disc, electronic photo frames), and more. On the Internet you can publish your material with a range of privacy options. You can collaborate or simply display the information.

Mobile devices allow people to take their research with them all the time and work remotely from all places. They are perfect to showcase the work done to family and friends and update the data whenever is needed.
How can I share and preserve memories in the digital era?
Daniel Horowitz

Daniel Horowitz is MyHeritage Chief Genealogist, providing key contributions in the areas of product development, customer support and public affairs; contacting genealogy societies, bloggers and media. Daniel is also heading the company's Translation department, where he has been instrumental in increasing MyHeritage's global language support. A power genealogist, researcher and lecturer himself, Daniel holds board level positions in a few genealogical societies. With a B.Sc. in Computer Engineering and a Specialization in Education & Management of Educational Institutions, he has a deep understanding of the needs of today's family history enthusiasts.

with Daniel Horowitz
The British India Army in World War 1

The British Indian Army in World War 1

The second largest army in the British Empire in 1914 was that of British India. It supported the Allies in all theatres, Western Front, Egypt-Palestine, Gallipoli, East Africa and, particularly, in Mesopotamia.  Peter will focus his talk on the operations in Mesopotamia and subsequent operations in Persia. He will describe the Nature of the Indian Army of the time, together with the records of the Europeans and Indians who led the army though to participate in the defeat of the Ottoman Empire.
 
The British India Army in World War 1
Peter Bailey

Peter Bailey is Chairman of the ‘Families in British India Society’ and lectures and writes books and articles on Family History in British India. He has nine ancestors who lived over four generations in India, four of them in the army, either the East India Company Army, the Indian Army or the British Army serving in India. Peter has been a Member of the Society of Genealogists for over 40 years and has served as a Trustee.

with Peter Bailey
12:15PM -
1:00PM
Beginner
What’s Been Done Before? Finding pedigrees online and at the SoG

With so many people tracing their family history, it’s quite possible something may already have been published on the family you are interested in or a cousin may also be working on the line. This talk will introduce sources both off and on-line that might be useful to look for your surnames.

What’s Been Done Before? Finding pedigrees online and at the SoG
Else Churchill

Else Churchill is the Genealogists at the Society of Genealogists with over 30 years’ experience as a genealogical researcher, librarian, writer and teacher. She loves helping people trace their family history and is responsible for putting together the SoG’s talks at WDYTYA? Live.

with Else Churchill
'Orphans, foundlings and outcasts': Irish records of children in care ca. 1840s to 1952

Prior to the introduction of the Adoption Act Ireland in 1952 all 'adoption' arrangements whereby a child was permanently raised by people other than their birth parents, were described as 'fostering' or colloquially as  being 'boarded out'. In this paper Fiona looks at the different sources that survive between ca. 1840s to 1952, that provide a paper trail to search for the origins of these children.

'Orphans, foundlings and outcasts': Irish records of children in care ca. 1840s to 1952
Fiona Fitzsimons

Fiona is a Director of Eneclann, a Trinity College Campus Company, and also of FindMyPast Ireland, the world's largest Irish family history record collection online.

One of Ireland’s best known genealogists, in June 2013 she was personally invited by the White House to give a private presentation in Trinity College to Michelle Obama and her daughters on the President's Irish family history.
Fiona lives in Dublin with her husband and three young sons.
with Fiona Fitzsimons
Beginner
Reading the Original

Going back to the original is an essential research technique, however deciphering a census sheet, certificate or early will can be tricky.   With more and more pre-1837 material appearing online are you able to read the handwriting to validate transcriptions and ensure the accuracy of your research?  Join experienced Family History Tutor, Jackie Depelle for ideas on where to go for specimen hands and formulaic transcripts as well as a variety of hints and tips on palaeography techniques.  There is immense satisfaction in cracking the code and reading the past. 

Reading the Original
Jackie Depelle

Jackie Depelle is a full-time Family History Tutor and Lecturer, Chairman of the Yorkshire Group of Family History Societies, member of the Guild of One-Name Studies and Genealogy Event Organiser.  During a 13 year teaching career in Family History, Jackie has a keen interest in spreading knowledge, enthusiasm and the skills needed to accurately research and record Family History.  Recently she has facilitating a 15th and 16th century palaeography course which gave many new levels of confidence to extend their research into older documents. 

with Jackie Depelle
All at Sea – serving in the Royal Navy during the First World War

In 1914 Britain had by the largest navy in the world. Yet during the First World War played a very limited part in the ultimate Allied victory. To such an extent that surplus sailors were sent to fight on the Western Front.  

This lecture will consider the men who served in the Royal Navy during this period and how you can research them and the ships they served on.  It will look at the resources that are online as well material at The National Archives, Royal Naval Museum and elsewhere which have yet to go online and perhaps never will.
All at Sea – serving in the Royal Navy during the First World War
Simon Fowler

Simon Fowler is a professional researcher, writer and tutor specialising in history. In recent years he has researched dozens of men and women who served across the world during the two worlds wars and given many talks on the subject.

His Tracing Your WW1 Ancestors’ book is the comprehensive guide to the subject currently in print.  Copies can be bought from the Pen & Sword Stand. Look out too for his guides to Army and Navy ancestors.
with Simon Fowler
1:15PM -
2:00PM
 
The National Archives: 'Using the National Archives Online and Onsite'

This lecture examines recent changes and additions to the National Archives website and onsite services. It also provides an insight into its programme of events commemorating the centenary of the First World War. 

The National Archives: 'Using the National Archives Online and Onsite'
Roger Kershaw

Roger Kershaw joined The National Archives in 1986 and is now the Head of Military, Maritime, Transport and Family records for the Advice and Records Knowledge department. 

 
Roger has over 25 years' experience in researching records at The National Archives and other archives. He has published five books: Immigrants and Aliens - a guide to sources on UK immigration and citizenship, Emigrants and Expats - a guide to sources on UK emigration and residents overseas, Family History On The Move, New Lives for Old - the story of Britain's child migrants, and Migration Records. He regularly appears at British genealogy fairs promoting the work of The National Archives and has previously presented international papers in the United States, Canada, and Australia.
 
with Roger Kershaw
Sin, Sex & Probate

This illustrated lecture shows that by studying activities of the Church Courts until the mid-19th century, we can unearth otherwise hidden data on our ancestors. Examples are shown of typical much-underused records containing wills and other probate documents, marriage licences, judgements on sexual misconduct of parishioners and clergy, abuse and defamation of neighbours, the appointment and discipline of clergy, and licences for midwives, doctors and schoolteachers. The depositions (statements) of witnesses, mostly in English, are in graphic detail and are excellent for migration studies.   

Sin, Sex & Probate
Dr Colin R Chapman

A Fellow of the Society, and former member of its Executive Committee. International lecturer and author of 14 genealogically-related books. Founder of six county-based family history societies, the President of three and Patron of another. A Freeman of the City of London and formerly a professional industrial chemist and engineer with international experience. Has spoken regularly on the Society’s lecture programme for several years and lectures regularly somewhere in the world on social, local and family history.

with Dr Colin R Chapman
Uncle Sam wants you!: an introduction to American military records

American military records can be a treasure trove of information and many immigrants served in the US armed forces. The draft for WWI alone meant that 24 million men (including non-citizens) were registered; this represents 23% of the US population in 1918. An introduction to American military records including type of information contained and where to find the records will be given and helpful and often obscure sources of information revealed. American born Tahitia McCabe will  cover what is likely to be found in state and federal libraries, archives and repositories and why while using a wealth of online sources.

Uncle Sam wants you!: an introduction to American military records
Tahitia McCabe

Tahitia McCabe was a librarian at the Alaska State Library and is currently a tutor and Knowledge Exchange Fellow at the University of Strathclyde’s Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies Postgraduate Programme. 

 
She has been tracing her American ancestors for years using online sources but also by spending quality time in US archives, libraries, courthouses and historical societies. 
with Tahitia McCabe
1:16PM -
2:30PM
Keynote + Q&A sesssion Keynote + Q&A sesssion
TBC with TBC
     
2:15PM -
3:00PM
 
Beginner
Researching your Jewish Ancestors

This lecture will cover the main sources of material that can be used to research Jewish families in the UK.   Special emphasis will be given to records specific to Jewish research as well as other materials of more general interest to immigrant families.

 
Some guidance will be given on extending your research into countries in Central and Eastern Europe as well as Holocaust materials.  The special challenges of Jewish naming conventions and Border changes will also be considered.
Researching your Jewish Ancestors
Michael Tobias

Michael Tobias has a BSc Honours in Mathematics and Physics and is a Fellow of the Faculty of Actuaries.  In 2012 he completed a Masters Degree in Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies at Strathclyde University.  He is a co-founder of  Jewish Records Indexing – Poland and  Vice President, Programming of JewishGen, Inc.  He was Database matching consultant to the International Commission on Holocaust Era Insurance Claims (ICHEIC).  Michael  assisted Steve Morse with his Ellis Island developments.  He has contributed to various Journals, Radio and TV Programmes including “Who Do You Think You Are” both in the UK and USA. He has spoken at several conferences including the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) annual conference since 1996 and was awarded their “Lifetime Achievement” award in Washington 2011. 

with Michael Tobias
Beginner
How Familysearch can help you locate your ancestors

FamilySearch has valuable family history and genealogical information available online and also through Family History Centers.  Familysearch provides free help and this lecture is to show how to access Genealogical Records indexed, imaged, and how to receive onsite or at home help and information through familysearch.  This lecture will explore the basic information on Records of Genealogical value on familysearch in its Historical Records Collections, The Family History Library Catalog and FamilySearch Wiki for the British Isles.  This lecture may also include how to find basic Genealogical Information from online websites*. (How much information is presented depends upon how much time is requested for this lecture*)

How Familysearch can help you locate your ancestors
Mark E. Gardner

Mark Ensign Gardner has been involved with Family History and Genealogical Research for 30 years.  He resides in Salt Lake City, Utah and works for British in the Family History Library which is part of FamilySearch. His time is spent of up to 6 hours a day in helping patrons at The Family History Library in using British Genealogical Records and determine research strategies to locate ancestry. Mr Gardner’s, background of genealogical research began in his youth and interest grew from his father David Gardner’s teachings and who is the author of Genealogical Research in England and Wales Volumes 1-3.  His experience in understanding and using British Genealogical records is a valuable asset in helping individuals in locating their family historical information.

with Mark E. Gardner
What Great Grandma did in the First World War: the Imperial War Museum’s Women’s Work Collection

The First World War was the first Total War and the first opportunity that women had to play a significant role in what had traditionally been regarded as a male domain.  Their role changed and developed as the years passed and this was reflected in the establishment of the Imperial War Museum.  The Women’s Work Collection is an extremely valuable source for tracing female family history in the Great War.

What Great Grandma did in the First World War: the Imperial War Museum’s Women’s Work Collection
Sarah Paterson
Sarah Paterson is Family History Librarian at the Imperial War Museum, and has worked there for 26 years.  She is the author of Tracing Your Family History: Army and edited the other books in this Imperial War Museum series. Tracing Your Prisoner of War Ancestors: The First World War was published in 2012, her book relating to tracing prisoners of war and civilian internees in the Second World War is due out later this year.
with Sarah Paterson
2:45PM -
3:30PM
Beginner
Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records

Scottish civil registration commenced in 1855 following the creation of the General Record Office for Scotland, some seventeen and half years after England and Wales. But since its creation Scottish statutory records have been compiled under the authority of Scots law, with many major differences between how things were done north of the border compared to the south – not least within the area of marriage. In this talk genealogist Chris Paton examines the history of Scottish civil registration, and the differences between Scots records and those of the rest of the United Kingdom.

Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records
Chris Paton

Originally from Northern Ireland, but with both Irish and Scottish roots, Chris Paton works full time in Scotland as a professional genealogist, lecturer, tutor and writer. Author of ten books, and with daily contributions to his British GENES blog (www.britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk), he also teaches Scottish based genealogy courses for Pharos Tutors (www.pharostutors.com) and has tutored on the Postgraduate Genealogical Studies programme at the University of Strathclyde. A director of the Scottish Archive Network and a member of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland user forum, Chris regularly gives talks across Scotland and also internationally in Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

with Chris Paton
     
3:15PM -
4:00PM
 
Scottish Retours of Services of Heirs and English Inquisitions Post-Mortem

Two neglected sets of records are Retours of services of heirs (Scotland) and Inquisitiones Post Mortem (England and Wales). These incredibly fruitful record sets are not easy to find, but are extremely rewarding for genealogists, local historians and anyone tracing inheritance to land. 

Bruce Durie compares and contrasts the two sets of records.
Scottish Retours of Services of Heirs and English Inquisitions Post-Mortem
Dr. Bruce Durie

Bruce Durie OLJ BSc (Hons) PhD FSAScot FCollT FIGRS FHEA  is Scotland’s best known genealogy researcher, author, broadcaster and lecturer, He founded and ran the Professional Postgraduate Programme in Genealogical, Heraldic and Palaeographic Studies at the University of Strathclyde, has a regular BBC Radio series Digging Up Your Roots and has written numerous books on historical, genealogical and other subjects including Victorian crime. Latest books include Scottish Genealogy (3rd Edn), Documents for Genealogy and Local History and Welsh Genealogy (all from The History Press).

He now teaches mainly for the University of Edinburgh, is deeply involved in plans for HomecomingScotland2014 and is Chief Genealogist and Historian for MacDonald and Rees Ltd, Edinburgh.
 
www.macdonaldandrees.com
 
with Dr. Bruce Durie
Tourism Ireland Tourism Ireland
TBC with TBC
Horses in World War One – Did your ancestors work in the Remount Service?

During World War 1 more than a million horses were pressed into military service on behalf of the British in Europe alone.  Although many horses came from Britain, many were obtained in America.  Many families have ancestors who worked with horses in that war. In this illustrated talk on behalf of the British Association for Local History, Phoebe Merrick will look at the role of horses in the war, and discuss their purchase, transport and training, using the Remount Depot at Romsey, Hampshire as a case study.

Horses in World War One – Did your ancestors work in the Remount Service?
Phoebe Merrick

Phoebe Merrick is an experienced local historian with a wide range of interests in local history.  She chairs Romsey Local History Society in Hampshire, and is a leader of her society’s regular research sessions.  She undertakes extensive research into the history of Romsey and its area and is much called on to give talks both in the town and neighbourhood.  Her talks on the Remount Depot have been much requested in Hampshire.  She is involved in a project to commission a statue of a warhorse to be erected in Romsey in memory of the Depot, its men and its horses.

with Phoebe Merrick
3:45PM -
4:30PM
Research Before 1837. What’s in the Parish Chest?

The Parish Chest contained a wealth of documents concerning everyday life in the parish. Many of these documents are useful to family historians and will help put your ancestors in the context of the period in which they lived. Most of these documents have never been indexed. This lecture will give those attending a brief overview of the types of documents that exist and the information that exists within them.

Research Before 1837. What’s in the Parish Chest?
Alec Tritton

A family historian for over 30 years, from 2002 to 2006 I was Chairman of the Federation of Family History Societies and for the previous 3 years, the Chairman of the Guild of One-Name Studies. I have also been Vice-Chairman of the Society of Genealogists and am currently on the Lectures Working Group and Chairman of the Halsted Trust. Having sold my business in 2002, I work selling investment property in Florida & as a Professional Blogger and SEO Specialist. In my spare time I have two “rare-bread” Dales Ponies, two cats and keep chickens and enjoy listening to smooth jazz.

I teach the Nonconformity Course for Pharos Tutors and have taught the Apprenticeship Course in the absence of the normal tutor.
I regularly carry out London Burial Ground walks for the Society of Genealogists and other London based organisations such as the Metropolitan Police Family History Society.
with Alec Tritton
     
4:15PM -
5:00PM
 
From highwaymen to bride thieves

 

Do you have a convict ancestor in your family tree? Or maybe you want to know more about Australia’s criminal past? Cassie Mercer, who has seven convict ancestors, will talk about how to use online resources to discover more about your convict, plus talk about some of Australia’s more colourful criminals, including those who managed to escape the colony illegally. 

From highwaymen to bride thieves
Cassie Mercer

Cassie Mercer is the editor of Inside History, a magazine for people passionate about the past. Inside History was launched in 2010 and focuses on Australian and New Zealand genealogy, history and heritage. Published bi-monthly, each beautifully designed 80-page issue is packed with inspirational and practical stories about family history, and the latest news and events. 

Cassie has worked in publishing since 1999 in Sydney and London. She caught the genealogy bug when she discovered her 5 x great grandfather was a highwayman and her 5 x great grandmother was a madam of a brothel in 18th-century Dublin. 
with Cassie Mercer
The perpetual incognito of being a Jones’: overcoming problems with surnames in Wales

The lecture will describe the processes whereby settled surnames became established in Wales and the seeming lack of variety which stemmed from this. However, the value of knowing the underlying variety which existed as a result of different cultural and religious influences, together with generally small populations in most areas, will be illustrated. Ways in which residual difficulties may be overcome will be discussed along with an assessment of the value of some modern finding aids.

The perpetual incognito of being a Jones’: overcoming problems with surnames in Wales
John Rowlands

A civil engineer by profession, he is co-author (with his wife, Sheila) of The Surnames of Wales – now in its second edition. For 15 years he was involved with ‘Family History in Wales’ courses at Aberystwyth University and has lectured widely on Welsh research in both Britain and the United States. In 1995 he was awarded a Fellowship of the Society of Genealogists. Recently he has received an MPhil degree (in history) at Aberystwyth University for research into ‘Investment in Shipping: North Cardiganshire in the Nineteenth Century; a study with some family history content.

with John Rowlands
The little known Battle of Lake Narocz 1916

In the spring of 1916 a poorly organised and badly orchestrated Russian offensive against a numerically inferior German Army took place in the low lying ditches, marshes, and forests surrounding the thawing Lake Narocz which failed catastrophically. It was so significant a loss to the Russians that it effectively paralysed their entire Army for the rest of the war and not only contributed to their early withdrawal from the war itself but possibly in the revolution that followed which removed the last Russian Tsar and effectively changed world geo-politics for ever.

The little known Battle of Lake Narocz 1916
Frank Pleszak

Frank Pleszak is an IT consultant from Manchester. He has written a book about his father’s incredible wartime journey from eastern Poland via the harsh Soviet labour camps of Siberia to England entitled “2 years in a Gulag”. He is currently finalising books on the unbelievable history of the famous Polish 2nd Corps and another describing the little known but highly significant WWI Russian spring offensive at Lake Narocz in 1916. Frank regularly gives talks on all these topics.

with Frank Pleszak
4:45PM -
5:30PM
Beginner
Newspapers for Family History

Newspapers are a rich source of information about our ancestors and their lives. Recent advances in technology mean that these wonderful records are now far more accessible than ever before. The author of Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records will demonstrate the type of information available using these records and the best ways to search in order to get the most from them. She will also discuss the recent changes caused by the closure of the British Newspaper Library at Colindale.

Newspapers for Family History
Celia Heritage

Family history has been Celia's passion since she first began tracing her own family tree as a teenager. After studying at the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies, where she gained a distinction in the Higher Certificate in Genealogy, she now runs her own company, HeritageFamilyHistory.co.uk, providing family history tuition and research services. This includes her own online family history course (The e-Course), whilst her book 'Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records' is one of publisher Pen and Sword's best selling family history books.

with Celia Heritage
     

Friday February 21st, 2014

Time Celebrity theatre / S.O.G. studio 1 S.O.G. studio 2 S.O.G. studio 3 S.O.G. studio 4/ WWI ANCESTORS
10:15AM -
11:00AM
Celebrity Workshop Celebrity Workshop
TBC with TBC
The Poor Laws & the Irish Poor

Rosalind will talk about the fate of the Irish poor, both in England & in Ireland, paying attention to causes, treatment & public attitudes.  She will include an examination of Irish poor law records, how they differ from English poor law records, what records exist in Ireland and where to find them.  She will also talk about Irish workhouses.

The Poor Laws & the Irish Poor
Rosalind McCutcheon

Rosalind is from Co Cork, Ireland, & began researching family & local history in her teens.  She graduated from Dublin University in English & Latin & has, since then, lived in London, where she works as an actress & singer.  She is a Fellow & Vice-President of the Irish Genealogical Research Society, which maintains its library in London, & has edited the Society’s biannual newsletter since 1991.  The Society website is www.irishancestors.ie Rosalind also runs her own research business, whose website is www.famhistladies.co.uk  Early in 2013 she also launched an Early Irish Marriage Finder via the IGRS website.

with Rosalind McCutcheon
How to get your ancestors’ names in print! Writing family history for magazines and newspapers

Learn how to get your ancestors' names in print with Cassie Mercer, editor of Inside History magazine. Hear about why it's so important to write about your family and local history, how to construct an article, how to choose an "angle" for the story, what editors look for, how to pitch to editors, and avenues to tell your stories, including blogs, newsletters, newspapers and magazines. Cassie will also provide examples of good story structure and pitches, and further resources to read. 

How to get your ancestors’ names in print! Writing family history for magazines and newspapers
Cassie Mercer

Cassie Mercer is the editor of Inside History, a magazine for people passionate about the past. Inside History was launched in 2010 and focuses on Australian and New Zealand genealogy, history and heritage. Published bi-monthly, each beautifully designed 80-page issue is packed with inspirational and practical stories about family history, and the latest news and events. 

Cassie has worked in publishing since 1999 in Sydney and London. She caught the genealogy bug when she discovered her 5 x great grandfather was a highwayman and her 5 x great grandmother was a madam of a brothel in 18th-century Dublin. 
 
with Cassie Mercer
The Welsh Experience of World War One 1914-1918

This is a project led by the National Library of Wales in partnership with Welsh Universities, Archives of BBC Cymru Wales and local archive offices.  A mass digitisation project of primary sources relating to World War One. It is a unique digital collection revealing the hidden history of World War One as it affected all aspects of Welsh life, language and culture.

 
These source materials have been until now fragmented and frequently inaccessible, yet they collectively form a unique resource of vital interest to researchers, students, and the public in Wales and beyond.
The Welsh Experience of World War One 1914-1918
Beryl Evans

I have worked at the National Library of Wales since 1985, working in various posts relating to family history and public services. At present I am the Research Services Manager. I have contributed to many radio and television programmes relating to family history over the years, as well as contributing and writing for various journals, magazines and giving talks on various aspects of Welsh family history.

 
At the moment I am one of the Archives Liaison Officers for the Federation of Family History Societies; Chairman of Cardiganshire FHS and Executive member of the Association of Family History Societies of Wales, Dyfed FHS and Powys FHS.
with Beryl Evans
11:15AM -
12:00PM
Celebrity Workshop Celebrity Workshop
TBC with TBC
The National Archives: The 1915 Merchant Navy Project

Janet will talk about the 1915 Merchant Navy Project being run in collaboration with the national Maritime Museum. She will discuss why the project came about, the progress that has been made and how important this project is going to be for family and maritime historians and why this will controiibute so much to the up and coming commemoration of the First World War.

The National Archives: The 1915 Merchant Navy Project
Janet Dempsey

Janet Dempsey Joined the National Archives in 2003 as a Reader Advisor. Her interest in Merchant Navy Records led to her taking on the role as Records Specialist for these and the records of the Royal Marines, Coastguard and Customs & Excise in 2007. She has co-authored a List and Index Society Volume about the crew of the Titanic; Ship Lost (2012). Her particular interest is in the Operational Records of Merchant Shipping, especially during WW2.

with Janet Dempsey
Tracing family history through the records of Scotland’s asylums

The development of a formal system of medical care for the mentally ill in Scotland from the 19th century has led to a wealth of records being created which can be invaluable sources for the study of family history. Patients were admitted to asylums for a number of reasons including depression, alcoholism and difficulties in childbirth and many recovered and were released. They left behind detailed case notes which often trace their family history and well as detailing their physical and mental state. Some records contain photographs and correspondence. This talk will examine the finding, accessing and using these records.  

Tracing family history through the records of Scotland’s asylums
Caroline Brown

Caroline Brown is Programme Leader for the Family History and Archive distance learning programmes offered by the Centre for Archive and Information Studies at the University of Dundee where she is also Deputy Archivist. A graduate in history she is on the council of the Scottish Council on Archives, has served as Treasurer for the Scottish Records Association and regularly lectures on archive and sources for family and local history.

with Caroline Brown
The Impact of World War One on rural communities

At the end of the Great War, there were fifty-two so called 'Thankful Villages' in the whole of Great Britain; villages to which all the young men who went to war, returned alive. Of these, fourteen have come to be known as doubly thankful - also losing no-one in World War Two. This lecture will provide an insight into the experience which shattered the pre-WW1 order and transformed society irrevocably, particularly in the small villages of rural Britain.

The Impact of World War One on rural communities
Kirsty Gray

Running her own research company ‘Family Wise Limited’, as well as being Chair of two international charities and Director of English Studies for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies, Kirsty Gray has an excellent reputation in genealogical circles as a lecturer, researcher and writer.

Researching two one-place studies in Devon and a one-name (surname) study with strong links to the West Country, Kirsty published her first book with Pen and Sword in 2013, entitled Tracing Your West Country Ancestors and her next publication, Tracing Your Industrial Ancestors will be published later this year.
with Kirsty Gray
12:15PM -
1:00PM
Beginner
Why Pay – the top free alternatives

These days none of us like to pay for information unless they have to. This lecture will look at some of the alternative websites that are around to help you with your research but without having to pay. However we will also cover the benefits of what extra you can get it you do pay.

Why Pay – the top free alternatives
John Hanson

John was a Systems Specialist in the banking industry before taking early retirement in 2001. He has been researching his family history for the past 30 years and has used computers and the Internet for his research since their early days. His speciality is the census is the author of “Getting the best from the 1911 census”

He now writes, lectures and teaches family history and was made a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists in 2005 for “Services to Genealogy”.
with John Hanson
Beginner
Collaborative Family History Research

Collaborative Family History is all about working together with family members and others to find, record and share information about your family.  It results in larger and more interesting family trees, incorporating more details and stories.  The collaboration process can also help break down some of the brick walls in your research.  This presentation will cover a range of tools and techniques for collaboration including social media and new technology in family history software and networks.

Collaborative Family History Research
Laurence Harris

Laurence Harris is UK Head of Genealogy for MyHeritage.com.  He is also a professional genealogist and has researched a number of personalities for the BBC “Who Do You Think You Are?” series.  He is a former Chairman of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain (JGSGB) and a former member of the National Archives User Advisory Group.  

with Laurence Harris
Beginner
Researching Yorkshire Ancestors

Due to its physical size and 1974 boundary changes researching your Yorkshire Ancestors may involve a wide variety of Record Offices within the historic county as well as others further afield.  With many exciting Yorkshire records due online Jackie Depelle and Roy Stockdill will present details of websites dedicated to Yorkshire information and material.  They will also highlight other resource rich Libraries, Archives, Repositories and Specialist Collections.

Researching Yorkshire Ancestors
Roy Stockdill and Jackie Depelle

Jackie Depelle is a full-time Family History Tutor and Lecturer, Chairman of the Yorkshire Group of Family History Societies, member of the Guild of One-Name Studies and Genealogy Event Organiser.  During a 13 year teaching career in Family History, Jackie has a keen interest in spreading knowledge, enthusiasm and the skills needed to accurately record and research alongside a commitment to run specialist activities in and around Yorkshire.

 
Roy Stockdill is a Trustee of the SoG, a regular writer for the commercial family history magazines and websites.  He is also a frequent lecturer on genealogy having edited the Journal of One-Name Studies for 10 years. He is Chairman of the London Group of Yorkshire Family History Societies which meets at the SoG four times a year and comprises people in the London and south-east region who have ancestral interests in Yorkshire. Roy has been involved in genealogy for 37 years.
 
with Roy Stockdill and Jackie Depelle
Beginner
Researching Australian World War 1 Military Personnel

It has been said that by fighting at Gallipoli in World War One, Australia came of age as a country.  Over 60 000 men in the Australian military in World War One were born in the UK and over 90% of the rest had UK ancestors one or more generations in their past. They served from Gallipoli, to Egypt to the mud of Flanders.  

 
This presentation will show the range of records and information that will allow you to find out more about and add life to  Australian World War One military personnel. 
 
Researching Australian World War 1 Military Personnel
Helen V Smith

Helen has researched since 1986 in Australia, England, Ireland and Wales with a strong interest in medical and social history. She is a Guild of One Name Studies member researching Quested, anywhere, anytime.

She has spoken nationally and internationally including on four of the Unlock the Past cruises.
She is the author of “Death Certificates and Archaic Medical Terms” and numerous family history articles..
She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, Genealogical Speakers Guild and is President of Southern Suburbs Branch of the Genealogical Society of Queensland.
She geneablogs http://helenvsmithresearch.blogspot.com.au/ and is on Twitter @HVSresearch
 
with Helen V Smith
1:15PM -
2:00PM
 
Beginner
Creating your own Family Reference Library and Catalogue– always at your finger tips!

"Creating your own Family Reference Library and Catalogue - always at your fingertips!" 

A combination of what you know and what you need to find out; what you have found and what is still to find; what has been created, scanned, printed, preserved, archived, perhaps, lost. Images, websites, databases, facts, tables - at your fingertips.  
Your very own personal family reference library and catalogue. One for each family.  Containing just what you need and organised just as you wish. 
Sound exciting? Worthwhile? It certainly is.  A template using TreePad Plus (www.treepad.com) but can be adapted for EverNote, Word, Excel etc.
Creating your own Family Reference Library and Catalogue– always at your finger tips!
Jan Gow

Jan started her family history research in Salt Lake City in 1981 having won the airfare from NZ to USA. Came away hooked on genealogy. Has been taking annual Hooked on Genealogy Tours to SLC and the UK since 1992. Purchased genealogy bookshop Beehive Books in 1987. Community College lecturer in Family History Research since 1985. Has lectured nationally & internationally (land & sea) since 1992.  Life Member, Past President & Treasurer of the NZ Society of Genealogists. Received AFFHO award for Meritorious Service to FH in 2006 and QSM (similar to MBE) and Fellow of the SoG in 2012.  

with Jan Gow
The National Archives: Start tracing your Tommy Ancestor in WW1

With millions of names and millions of records, this talk will take you from items which recorded various aspects of a soldier's career, such as medals, certificates and official records and  guide you through all of the most appropriate records to build up a fuller history of the soldier as possible.

The National Archives: Start tracing your Tommy Ancestor in WW1
William Spencer

William Spencer is the Principal Military Specialist at The National Archives where he has worked since 1993. He served in the Royal Navy, including operational service in the Falklands in 1982, and holds an MA in War Studies from the prestigious Department of War Studies at King's College London. 

William is the author of the bestselling books Medals: the Researcher's Guide, Army Records, Air Force Records and Family History in the Wars.
with William Spencer
1914-1920 Prisoner of War Camps in Britain

 

Both German civilian internees and military personnel captured during combat were termed prisoners of war during the Great War. Many POWs were held at parent camps and their satellite working camps across Britain between 1914 and 1920, when all were repatriated to Germany. This illustrated talk describes life (with some escapes and deaths) for both civilians and combatants in these camps; it is based on prisoners’ letters and photographs, on camp reports by independent inspectors from America (until 1917), Switzerland and Sweden, on newspaper accounts, and on the recorded practical support by the YMCA, Quakers and individuals.

1914-1920 Prisoner of War Camps in Britain
Dr Colin R Chapman

A Fellow of the Society, and former member of its Executive Committee. International lecturer and author of 14 genealogically-related books. Founder of six county-based family history societies, the President of three and Patron of another. A Freeman of the City of London and formerly a professional industrial chemist and engineer with international experience. Has spoken regularly on the Society’s lecture programme for several years and lectures regularly somewhere in the world on social, local and family history.

with Dr Colin R Chapman
1:16PM -
2:30PM
Keynote + Q&A sesssion Keynote + Q&A sesssion
TBC with TBC
     
2:15PM -
3:00PM
 
PRONI Online Resources

This presentation will highlight the various sources available to users on the PRONI website, including Valuation Records, Wills, Street Directories and Ulster Covenant. It will illustrate how users can search and browse the applications and provide examples which dispel many of the Irish myths.

PRONI Online Resources
Stephen Scarth

Stephen Scarth is Head of Public Services at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) since August 2010 and has responsibility for all visitor related services for both onsite and online users. In addition, he leads on the delivery of exhibitions, events and for the marketing of PRONI at Titanic Quarter. Stephen joined PRONI in 1996 and has worked extensively on both private and official records and led on the implementation and roll out of PRONI’s Electronic Catalogue which went live in 2008.

with Stephen Scarth
Tales from the Tombstones

The British Association for Cemeteries in South Asia, founded in 1977, is the oldest Association dealing with people whose ancestors were born or worked in India between 1600 and 1947. BACSA cares for all British graves, civilian and military, apart from the dead of the two World Wars.  Many fascinating stories have emerged during BACSA’s research and restoration projects often initiated by a descendant trying to trace a grave. We would like to share some of these with you and to tell you about our work and our archives at the British Library. 

Tales from the Tombstones
Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

I have been the Hon. Secretary of BACSA since 2004, and founded the BACSA journal ‘Chowkidar’ in 1977, and am still its editor.  I studied Urdu and Hindi at London University, and have a PhD in colonial architecture.  A frequent visitor to India I am currently a lecturer for Martin Randall Travel in Bengal.  I am the author of a number of books on the British period in India and have lectured widely both in Britain, the USA and India. 

 
with Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones
World War I and Nonconformists: sources of information at Dr Williams’s Library

Were your World War I era ancestors English nonconformists?  If so come and learn about the resources available to family historians at Dr Williams’s Library, the pre-eminent research library of English Protestant nonconformity. Drawing on the unique resources such as the Christian World newspaper, the Congregational Year Book, and samples from the 300,000 volume library, find out how Baptists, Methodists, English Presbyterians and Unitarians dealt with the war.  Included will be samples from the Surman Index another unique resource for tracing nonconformist ministers and their churches.

World War I and Nonconformists: sources of information at Dr Williams’s Library
Fiona Turnbull

Fiona Turnbull is the Librarian at Dr Williams’s Library and holds a Masters Degree in Library and Information Studies from Rutgers University.  After a distinguished career in America as both a librarian and rare book dealer, she returned to her home country of England two years ago after a few years of teaching in Asia.  Passionate about history and genealogy she is excited to open up this historic 300 year old institution to a wider audience and encourages family historians to explore the richness of its collections.

with Fiona Turnbull
2:45PM -
3:30PM
A to Z of Family History: an alphabetical journey through some less well known sources

This session covers a pot pourri of more unusual sources that can help to enhance a family history. Based on Janet’s experiences editing Family Historians’ Enquire Within, here are what she terms ‘the best bits’. These range from advertising, through famine orphans and royal warrant holders, to how to engage young people in family history. There should be something to interest all researchers who are hoping to acquire a more rounded picture of their ancestors’ lives.

A to Z of Family History: an alphabetical journey through some less well known sources
Dr Janet Few

Janet is an experienced family, social and community historian, She works as an historical interpreter, spending time living in the C17th as Mistress Agnes. Janet’s book  Coffers, Clysters, Comfrey and Coifs: the lives of our C17th ancestors describes the social history of the period. She also edited the latest edition of the classic Family Historians’ Enquire Within. Janet has written for Family Tree Magazine and taken part in Who Do You Think You Are? Her community history research focuses on North Devon, particularly emigration from the area during the C19th. Further details can be found here http://thehistoryinterpreter.wordpress.com

with Dr Janet Few
     
3:15PM -
4:00PM
 
Beginner
Records at FamilySearch for Tracing British Soldiers Abroad

This class will highlight hidden treasures found at FamilySearch’s renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake and other outside (extra-National Archives, UK) resources available to researchers worldwide. Significant resources exist for those researching military personnel who served and/or settled abroad such as in Canada, the United States, in the Honourable East India Company (military establishment), in the South Pacific, South Africa, and more. Also featured are rich databases, and repositories both within and outside the UK for those holding military ancestry.

Records at FamilySearch for Tracing British Soldiers Abroad
Phillip Bradsell Dunn

Phillip is a genealogist with over 30 years professional genealogical research experience in the UK, Ireland, including British subjects abroad; he has worked for FamilySearch for 35 years, and currently is Senior British Research Consultant at its flagship Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. He’s lived, studied in the UK, and lectures to international audiences via Webinar.

He specializes in greater London and 'Home' counties; in “brickwall’ research i.e. Lancashire and London; 17th Century English emigration, military, nonconformist, and in Irish emigration abroad. He currently writes England Wiki (see Wiki.FamilySearch.org) “Parish” pages (i.e. Lancashire or Yorkshire “Parishes” pages).
with Phillip Bradsell Dunn
Company & Business Records

The potential information on our ancestors that may exist in the records of companies and businesses is considered. Ways of finding out about the existence of  businesses from the 19th Century onwards are discussed, the means of locating where surviving records have been deposited are explored and major repositories for business records identified. Many examples of informative records are presented from online internet sources, libraries and archives.

Company & Business Records
Eric D. Probert

Eric Probert is a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists and has been researching family history for over 30 years. He has contributed to genealogical publications both as an editor and author and has given presentations on a variety of family history topics across the UK.

with Eric D. Probert
Family life in wartime: illegitimacy, marriage, divorce and bigamy, 1914-1920

How did the First World War affect family life in this country? What was its impact on the number and rate of births outside marriage, or on the popularity of marriage itself? What support was available for the family members of soldiers, and did this vary according to the type of family? Did the stresses and strains of wartime affect the likelihood of a marriage breaking down through, and to what extent did individuals resort to either bigamy or divorce? In setting out the general trends in this period, it is intended to assist family historians in interpreting their findings.

 
Family life in wartime: illegitimacy, marriage, divorce and bigamy, 1914-1920
Professor Rebecca Probert

Professor Rebecca Probert is the leading academic authority on the history of marriage law in England and Wales. She has taught at the University of Warwick for the past decade and is the author of many scholarly articles and monographs. She has also appeared numerous times on TV and radio, and her work has been widely recognised as rewriting modern understandings of past marriage practices. Vitally for family historians, her research into marriage practices in past centuries is grounded not just in analysis of case-law but in a great many detailed, large-scale cohort studies of communities across England and Wales.

 
with Professor Rebecca Probert
3:45PM -
4:30PM
What next? Pre 1837 registers in the archives, online and at the SoG

Parish registers are the most important genealogy source before the census years. This talk will explain what information they hold and how they can be used to take your family history further.

What next? Pre 1837 registers in the archives, online and at the SoG
Else Churchill

Else Churchill is the Head Genealogist at the Society of Genealogists with over 30 years’ experience as a genealogical researcher, librarian, writer and teacher. She loves helping people trace their family history and is responsible for putting together the SoG’s talks at WDYTYA? Live.

with Else Churchill
     
4:15PM -
5:00PM
 
Who was in the Victorian workhouse?

Our picture of the Victorian workhouse is strongly coloured by Dickens’ writings, in particular by Oliver Twist. But who were the inmates of the union workhouses? The inmates ranged from the aged to pregnant women, orphaned and deserted children, lunatics, the sick and the able-bodied. Using recent and ongoing research, this talk examines the life histories, both inside and outside the workhouse, of a cohort of  inmates of an urban-industrial union workhouse in the late nineteenth century. The first admission of a cohort member was in 1856, the last discharge was in 1951 – a span of 95 years.

Who was in the Victorian workhouse?
Peter Park

Peter Park has been actively involved in his own and other people’s family history research for over forty years. He is a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists and Vice President of Cumbria FHS. He was awarded an MA by the University of Central Lancashire for his research into the Poor Law Commission’s home migration scheme of the 1830s. An international speaker on family history and associated topics, a number of his articles have appeared in The Genealogists’ Magazine, Ancestors, Your Family Tree, Local Population Studies , Who Do You Think You Are and The Bulletin of Local and Family History.

with Peter Park
Beginner
Scottish Church Records before Statutory Registration in 1855

Before 1855 the Established Church of Scotland was the dominant church. But there were many other churches, the Secession Churches of the 18th century, the Free Church following the Disruption of 1843, the Episcopal and Catholic Churches, and numerous smaller churches. It has been suggested that in the 18th century as many as 15% of events do not appear on ScotlandsPeople, and following the Disruption, in the period 1843-1854, many as 50% of vital records may be held in other records in the NRS. This lecture is meant as an aid to finding these ‘missing links’.

Scottish Church Records before Statutory Registration in 1855
Bruce B. Bishop

Bruce B Bishop born in Walsall, England. Spent 20 years as a meteorologist, and a similar length of time as a teacher at Gordonstoun School. Now a professional genealogist and researcher in archives, author of ‘Lost Moray and Nairn’ and ‘Lost Badenoch and Strathspey’ (Birlinn), and a series of booklets on the lands and people of the parishes of Moray and Banffshire. Chairman of the Scottish Association of Family History Societies and a member of ASGRA. Especially interested in the documentary records of the late 17th and the 18th century in Scotland.

with Bruce B. Bishop
British Civilian Prisoners of War in First World War Germany

In 2014 Britain commemorates the one hundredth anniversary of the First World War, and the sacrifices of those who served and ultimately gave their lives in the war to end all wars. But the war did not just have military victims, with 2014 also the centenary anniversary of the internment of over 5500 British and  Chris Paton Ruhleben Prisoner of War camp near Berlin. As bloody hell erupted around them, their only crime was to be in the wrong place in Europe at the wrong time when war was declared against Germany. Chris Paton tells their story.

British Civilian Prisoners of War in First World War Germany
Chris Paton

Originally from Northern Ireland, but with both Irish and Scottish roots, Chris Paton works full time in Scotland as a professional genealogist, lecturer, tutor and writer. Author of ten books, and with daily contributions to his British GENES blog (www.britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk), he also teaches Scottish based genealogy courses for Pharos Tutors (www.pharostutors.com) and has tutored on the Postgraduate Genealogical Studies programme at the University of Strathclyde. A director of the Scottish Archive Network and a member of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland user forum, Chris regularly gives talks across Scotland and also internationally in Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

with Chris Paton
4:45PM -
5:30PM
Online Resources for Occupations and Professions

The internet provides a wealth of resources, both free and commercial, relating to our ancestors’ working lives: not just background history, online indexes and record transcriptions, trade directories, and a host of volunteer-run projects. This talk will provide an overview of the sort of material you can find for not only the well-documented professions such as medicine and the law, but craft and trade occupations like those of the blacksmith and the publican.

Online Resources for Occupations and Professions
Peter Christian

Peter Christian has been researching his genealogy for 35 years and first put his family tree on the web in 1995. A Fellow of the Society of Genealogists and a trustee of Genuki, he has written countless articles on using the Internet for family history and is the author of The Genealogist's Internet.

with Peter Christian
     

Saturday February 22nd, 2014

Time Celebrity theatre / S.O.G. studio 1 S.O.G. studio 2 S.O.G. studio 3 S.O.G. studio 4/ WWI ANCESTORS
10:15AM -
11:00AM
Celebrity Workshop Celebrity Workshop
Colin Jackson CBE with Colin Jackson CBE
Beginner
Finding Nonconformist records online

This talk will look at websites that contain nonconformist records such as FamilySearch and BMD registers as well as useful sites for historical background and information about nonconformity. 

Finding Nonconformist records online
Alec Tritton

A family historian for over 30 years, from 2002 to 2006 I was Chairman of the Federation of Family History Societies and for the previous 3 years, the Chairman of the Guild of One-Name Studies. I have also been Vice-Chairman of the Society of Genealogists and am currently on the Lectures Working Group and Chairman of the Halsted Trust. Having sold my business in 2002, I work selling investment property in Florida & as a Professional Blogger and SEO Specialist. In my spare time I have two “rare-bread” Dales Ponies, two cats and keep chickens and enjoy listening to smooth jazz.

I teach the Nonconformity Course for Pharos Tutors and have taught the Apprenticeship Course in the absence of the normal tutor.
I regularly carry out London Burial Ground walks for the Society of Genealogists and other London based organisations such as the Metropolitan Police Family History Society.
with Alec Tritton
Beginner
The Scottish Poor Law: a source for family historians

The systems for the relief of the poor in Scotland differed considerably from the English system of poor relief. Both the ‘old’ and ‘new’ Scottish Poor Laws produced distinctive records which are rich resources for family history. From Kirk Session minutes, heritors’ records, hearth tax rolls, applications for poor relief and poor rolls to parochial board minutes and poorhouse registers, the records arising from the Scottish Poor Laws will be examined to reveal the nature, extent and location of sources for family history research within Scotland how to research them and how they can be used.

The Scottish Poor Law: a source for family historians
Patricia Whatley

Patricia Whatley is University Archivist & Head of Archive, Records Management and Museum Services/Director of the Centre for Information Studies at the University of Dundee, which offers a masters degree and diploma in family and local history by distance learning. She is a registered archivist, a history graduate and has just completed a history PhD thesis. She is Chair of the Council of the Economic and Social History Society of Scotland, Vice-Chair of the Scottish Council on Archives, and is a trustee of the Scottish Historical Review Trust. She regularly lectures and writes on history, archival and family history topics.

with Patricia Whatley
Beginner
ScotlandsPeople – interesting examples plus military references and an overview of the Scottish soldiers wills

Details of interesting examples of records available on the ScotlandsPeople website and at the National Records of Scotland in Edinburgh. Records that refer to the military will be included and a preview of the soldier’s wills released August 2013 to commemorate WW1.

ScotlandsPeople – interesting examples plus military references and an overview of the Scottish soldiers wills
Iain Ferguson

Iain Ferguson is the Centre Manager at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh. 

with Iain Ferguson
11:15AM -
12:00PM
Celebrity Workshop Celebrity Workshop
Colin Jackson CBE with Colin Jackson CBE
Discovering the Lives and Experiences of our Ancestors

This talk discusses the amazing variety of archive and printed sources that can be used to build up a picture of the past lives and experiences of our ancestors.  Drawing upon the rich collections of Surrey History Centre, it will show how early illustrations, the Gentleman’s Magazine, parish correspondence, quarter sessions papers, institutional records, personal letters and diaries can vividly illustrate the personal experiences of ‘ordinary’ people. This talk looks beyond parish registers and census returns to explore a range of materials that can help you piece together your family tree, and also to bring the past to life.

Discovering the Lives and Experiences of our Ancestors
Julian Pooley

Julian Pooley is Public Services Manager of Surrey History Centre in Woking and has been a professional archivist for over twenty-five years.  As archivist in charge of the public searchroom he is fascinated by the potential of many unexpected sources for family history research.  Away from work, he is preparing a guide to the archive of the Nichols family of printers who produced the Gentleman’s Magazine between 1778 and 1856 and many important county histories.  He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Honorary Visiting Fellow at the Centre for English Local History at the University of Leicester.

with Julian Pooley
Beginner
Tracing Your Welsh Ancestors

This presentation is aimed for all with interest in Welsh family history, demonstrating the problems that may be encountered when doing research in Wales – geography, surnames, the language, nonconformity.  How and where to gain access to records in Wales and discuss some sources that may not usually be considered such as manorial and estate records.

Tracing Your Welsh Ancestors
Beryl Evans

I have worked at the National Library of Wales since 1985, working in various posts relating to family history and public services. At present I am the Research Services Manager. I have contributed to many radio and television programmes relating to family history over the years, as well as contributing and writing for various journals, magazines and giving talks on various aspects of Welsh family history.

 
At the moment I am one of the Archives Liaison Officers for the Federation of Family History Societies; Chairman of Cardiganshire FHS and Executive member of the Association of Family History Societies of Wales, Dyfed FHS and Powys FHS.
with Beryl Evans
Tracing prisoners of war and internees in the First and Second World Wars

This talk looks at the prisoner experience (both military and civilian) and suggests ways to find out more about any ancestor who was taken captive in either conflict. 

Tracing prisoners of war and internees in the First and Second World Wars
Sarah Paterson

Sarah Paterson is Family History Librarian at the Imperial War Museum, and has worked there for 26 years.  She is the author of Tracing Your Family History: Army and edited the other books in this Imperial War Museum series. Tracing Your Prisoner of War Ancestors: The First World War was published in 2012, her book relating to tracing prisoners of war and civilian internees in the Second World War is due out later this year.

with Sarah Paterson
12:15PM -
1:00PM
Finding your London Ancestors

London has all the usual problems of family history plus some extra ones of its own. This lecture will make it all clear and explain the great developments of the last few years that have made research much easier

Finding your London Ancestors
Michael Gandy

Michael Gandy is a Londoner and has been tracing his ancestry since 1963. He is a former Chairman of SoG and presently editor of the Genealogists' Magazine. He was Chairman of the Catholic FHS for 14 years, founding Chairman of the Quaker FHS and is Research Officer for the Huguenot Society. He is well known for his work on nonconformists, London and the Irish in England.

with Michael Gandy
‘I make my address to you being an inmate…’: letters of the Victorian poor in England and Wales, c. 1834-1871

Poor people are often the subject of the written archive. This talk concentrates on collections of letters written by the poor themselves and which described their own poverty. Based on newly catalogued records held at The National Archives we assess the subject matter with the poor raised with the local and national poor law authorities. 

 
Although the poor (like any class of people in a past society) may be careful of the words they used to elicit welfare payments it is clear that many of these exciting letters directly represent the words, thoughts and feelings of the poor themselves.
‘I make my address to you being an inmate…’: letters of the Victorian poor in England and Wales, c. 1834-1871
Paul Carter and Natalie Whistance

Dr Paul Carter is the Principal Records Specialist Manager (Domestic Records) at The National Archives. He was also recently a research fellow at the University of Nottingham looking at 19th century poverty. He is the Project Director of The British Association for Local History’s Pauper Prisons… Pauper Palaces (Midlands)

 
Natalie Whistance is the Research and Records Coordinator for Pauper Prisons…Pauper Palaces (Midlands) and has previously worked at The National Archives and the Bishopsgate Library
 
Between them they have provided numerous talks and written extensively for local, family and academic history audiences interested in poverty during the Victorian period.
with Paul Carter and Natalie Whistance
Starting Your Irish Family History

In this lecture, Helen Kelly MAPGI  will outline the various preparatory steps that you need to take in preparation for your Irish family history research. Her lecture will include a step-by-step guide to the main sources for your Irish family history research, such as church records of baptism and marriage, civil records of birth, death and marriage, available census returns, and land/property records, and how they may be accessed.

Starting Your Irish Family History
Helen Kelly

Helen Kelly is an accredited genealogist and a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland (APGI). She has been involved in genealogy and tourism for over twenty years. In 1995 she joined the APGI team of consultant genealogists at the Genealogical Office, and later served as a consultant genealogist at the National library of Ireland and the National Archives.  Since 2007 Helen has been genealogist-in-residence at Dublin’s historical Shelbourne Hotel where she bears the unique title of  Genealogy Butler!  As in previous years, Helen is consultant genealogist on the Tourism Ireland stand at WDYTYA Live 2014. 

with Helen Kelly
Beginner
Remnants of a Lost Life

With the forthcoming Great War commemorative events many people are looking for both family and local history sources to research ancestors or local people.  With an ancestor having served in the early days of the Royal Flying Corps Jackie grew up with his picture and framed medals on the wall of her Grandparents’ home.  The discovery of his diary and war photographs, returned from France, became one of Jackie’s most treasured family possessions and the focus of her research.  Many difference sources are used to illustrate Remnants of a Lost Life – a brief encounter with Life and World War 1.

Remnants of a Lost Life
Jackie Depelle

Jackie Depelle is a full-time Family History Tutor and Lecturer, Chairman of the Yorkshire Group of Family History Societies, member of the Guild of One-Name Studies and Genealogy Event Organiser.  During a 13 year teaching career in Family History, Jackie has a keen interest in spreading knowledge, enthusiasm and the skills needed to accurately research and record Family History.  Recently she has facilitating a 15th and 16th century palaeography course which gave many new levels of confidence to extend their research into older documents. 

with Jackie Depelle
1:15PM -
2:00PM
 
Beginner
Starting from Scratch

A very basic introduction to Family History. Covering how to organise your thoughts, draft out a pedigree and birth brief and possible usage. Searching for basic information on web sites and which may perhaps better suit your purpose. How to search for census information and just a few problems that may be encountered e.g. use of Poor law union divisions. The use of will indexes post 1858. A brief look a parish registers and what may be found. A chance to ask a question.

Starting from Scratch
Dominic Johnson

Dominic Johnson B.Sc L.H.G. a professional family historian, teacher and lecturer of family history of some 40 years standing who has held positions of responsibility in various organisations namely President of Notts FHS and Registrar of the Guild of One- Name Studies. 

Military history and a keen interest in palaeography, both of any periods, are perhaps at the forefront of my interests. My  transcription and translation of a  15th century draft account book of a small priory in Leicestershire, mentioned in previous years, is now published, in parallel text Latin and English,  and  available, though not at normal bookshops.
with Dominic Johnson
Shipwrecked! Ancestors Lost at Sea.

A practical guide to tracing people (crews, passengers) lost at sea during peace and wartime. Focuses on online sources (free and subscription), and the documents available at archives (including local archives, National Archives, and specialist archives such as Guildhall Library). 

The value and use of these sources will be demonstrated via a series of real case histories, telling the story of individuals and their fates. Shipwrecks are often intriguing problems to solve and I welcome the opportunity to share my experience with others.
Shipwrecked! Ancestors Lost at Sea.
Dr Simon Wills

I have been investigating maritime ancestors for over 25 years as a genealogist, researcher, and writer. I am a regular contributor to a number of family history magazines, and author of the books Tracing Your Merchant Navy Ancestors (Pen & Sword, 2012) and the forthcoming title Voyages From The Past: A History of British Passengers at Sea (2014) amongst others. I recently assisted the National Archives to update their Research Guide on shipwrecks, and was invited to speak at the opening of Southampton’s Sea City museum and at the Guildhall Library as part of the Titanic commemorations.

with Dr Simon Wills
Beginner
Remembrance and Community: war memorials and local history

War memorials are familiar to family historians, and will become increasingly a focus for their interest as the centenaries of the First World War approach. This lecture will encourage you to go beyond the lists of names to explore how decisions were made about the memorial, its style, financing, location, wording, and its place in the local community for subsequent generations.

Remembrance and Community: war memorials and local history
Dr Jane Howells

Dr Jane Howells is editor of Local History News for the British Association for Local History. She is an experienced author, and a regular speaker to local and family history organisations. 

with Dr Jane Howells
1:16PM -
2:30PM
Keynote + Q&A sesssion Keynote + Q&A sesssion
TBC with TBC
     
2:15PM -
3:00PM
 
The National Archives: Nationality, Aliens and defence of the realm

In 1914 British nationality law was codified; common law and statute law were brought together for the first time. The outbreak of war introduced restrictions on aliens and shortly thereafter internment for those considered enemy aliens. This talk looks at the legal, moral and social implications for those aliens, and those of alien descent who considered themselves loyal Britons. Also those women who had married foreign nationals and lost their British nationality. Anti-German feeling grew during the course of the war resulting in even the head of state changing the name of his family and dynasty. Records of government and of individuals in the National Archives shed light on this wartime paranoia and fear of the enemy within.

The National Archives: Nationality, Aliens and defence of the realm
Mark Pearsall

Mark Pearsall joined The National Archives in 1983, before which he worked in Birmingham Public Libraries in the Local Studies Library and City Archives. He has worked in several departments at The National Archives, mainly in reader services and records departments. Mark has produced various guides and finding aids and a number of publications including Family History Companion, and co-authored Family History On The Move and Immigrants and Aliens. His research interests include; nationality and citizenship, parish history and administration and local government and county administration.

with Mark Pearsall
Making More of Census Returns – understanding relationships”

Each person encountered in census returns has one of a number of ‘relationships’ listed alongside their name, but the true value of this single word can often be overlooked in favour of other details. The researcher can glean much about an individual and their circumstances (past and present) through interpreting these terms. This illustrated presentation will offer some ideas for looking at the stated ‘relationship’ from different perspectives, such as :– the individual person; the household of which they are a part at the time; both the immediate and the wider family; earlier/later censuses; and, other known information. 

Making More of Census Returns – understanding relationships”
Caroline Norton

By day a health care professional, and out-of-hours, a family and local historian, with 25+ years’ experience of research which has taken me all around the country and beyond. A long involvement with my local FHSs has enabled me to “put something back” into genealogy, first as a committee member, then programme organiser and, now, journal editor. I also help with answering attendees’ research queries at meetings, where my interest in census records is particularly useful with the problem solving; this will be my fourth WDYTYALive presentation on tips and ideas to help make more of this key genealogical source.

with Caroline Norton
Beginner
World War One: Women in War

Before the outbreak of World War One in 1914, a woman's role in the workplace was quite restricted, jobs for women consisted mainly of domestic work, nursing, teaching and agriculture if their family owned a small holding. The Great War changed the role of women in the workplace forever and this lecture details the unsung heroes of the war who kept the industrial wheels turning and the home fires burning as well as nursing injured service personnel and serving in the forces as non-combatants during World War One.

 
World War One: Women in War
Kirsty Gray

Running her own research company ‘Family Wise Limited’, as well as being Chair of two international charities and Director of English Studies for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies, Kirsty Gray has an excellent reputation in genealogical circles as a lecturer, researcher and writer.

Researching two one-place studies in Devon and a one-name (surname) study with strong links to the West Country, Kirsty published her first book with Pen and Sword in 2013, entitled Tracing Your West Country Ancestors and her next publication, Tracing Your Industrial Ancestors will be published later this year

with Kirsty Gray
2:45PM -
3:30PM
Wills: not just a source for our better-off ancestors

It's a misconception that it was only our better off ancestors who made wills while it is undoubtedly true that wills are of such great potential value for the family historian that you really can't afford to overlook them. The author of Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records will look in detail at just how useful wills can be for building your family tree, and finding out more about your family. She will also demonstrate the best ways of accessing them, making full use of online and record office sources.

Wills: not just a source for our better-off ancestors
Celia Heritage

Family history has been Celia's passion since she first began tracing her own family tree as a teenager. After studying at the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies, where she gained a distinction in the Higher Certificate in Genealogy, she now runs her own company, HeritageFamilyHistory.co.uk, providing family history tuition and research services. This includes her own online family history course (The e-Course), whilst her book 'Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records' is one of publisher Pen and Sword's best selling family history books.

with Celia Heritage
     
3:15PM -
4:00PM
 
Beginner
Researching Irish Family History Online

This paper will give an overview of all projects, both private and state funded, to publish Irish records online. There has been great progress over the last ten years, but what has been done? And what needs to be done? This talk will focus on three issues. Firstly, the background to digitisation in Ireland, and the reasons for the slow pace of development in the past. Secondly, an overview of the major projects in Ireland or abroad dealing with Irish records, and lastly, the options for future progress, and how the genealogical community abroad can help us in Ireland.

Researching Irish Family History Online
Brian Donovan

Brian is CEO of Eneclann and a Director of brightsolid online publishing Ireland (findmypast Ireland), two of the leading genealogical companies in Ireland. He jointly founded Eneclann in 1998 at Trinity College Dublin, with responsibility for the company’s digitisation and electronic publishing programme. In developing these companies, and acting as advisor to Ireland’s cultural institutions, he has been at the forefront of the extraordinary transformation of Ireland’s genealogical heritage online. He played a key role in establishing www.findmypast.ie now the largest online resource for Irish genealogical research with over 70 million records.

with Brian Donovan
Putting your Ancestors in their Place: sources for reconstructing nineteenth century communities

Our ancestors did not live in isolation. They had neighbours, communities, homes and workplaces. This session describes how to build up the history of a locality and provide a context for our ancestors’ lives. Focussing mainly on the C19th, the sources described range from the well known to the more obscure. Community reconstruction is explained. Such reconstruction involves dissecting a small, definable, geographical area to conduct a detailed examination of the individuals, buildings and processes of the past. This includes reconstructing the physical surroundings, populating the community and creating kinship networks between its inhabitants.

Putting your Ancestors in their Place: sources for reconstructing nineteenth century communities
Dr Janet Few

Janet is an experienced family, social and community historian, She works as an historical interpreter, spending time living in the C17th as Mistress Agnes. Janet’s book  Coffers, Clysters, Comfrey and Coifs: the lives of our C17th ancestors describes the social history of the period. She also edited the latest edition of the classic Family Historians’ Enquire Within. Janet has written for Family Tree Magazine and taken part in Who Do You Think You Are? Her community history research focuses on North Devon, particularly emigration from the area during the C19th. Further details can be found here http://thehistoryinterpreter.wordpress.com

with Dr Janet Few
Overcoming trench walls – how to break out from your WW1 research problems and advance to ultimate genealogical victory

On the surface researching men who served in the First World War is easy.  And so often it is.  But there are numerous shell holes that could entrap the unwary. 

This lecture will suggest various research strategies and records that can help if you have fallen into one of these shell holes.  Have you used parish magazines or probate calendars?  And what are Silver War Badges and regimental histories?  And, above all, what will you do if there is a clerical mistake; your ancestor isn’t where he should be, or there are two soldiers with exactly the same details?     
Overcoming trench walls – how to break out from your WW1 research problems and advance to ultimate genealogical victory
Simon Fowler

Simon Fowler is a professional researcher, writer and tutor specialising in history. In recent years he has researched dozens of men and women who served across the world during the two worlds wars and given many talks on the subject.

His Tracing Your WW1 Ancestors’ book is the comprehensive guide to the subject currently in print.  Copies can be bought from the Pen & Sword Stand. Look out too for his guides to Army and Navy ancestors.
with Simon Fowler
3:45PM -
4:30PM
Where do we come from? – What genetics tells us about the peopling of the British Isles

There is a great deal of interest in fine-scale population structure in the UK, particularly as a signature of historical immigration events. A powerful means of detecting such structure is to control and document carefully the provenance of the samples involved. Here we describe the collection of a cohort of rural UK samples (The People of the British Isles), aimed at providing a well-characterised UK population that can be used as a resource by the research community as well as providing fine-scale genetic information on the British population.  Analysis including Europe sheds light on the peopling of the British Isles.

Where do we come from? – What genetics tells us about the peopling of the British Isles
Bruce Winney

Bruce Winney is a researcher in Sir Walter Bodmer’s Laboratory at Oxford University.  His background is population genetics of animals (i.e. looking at genetic differences between populations) and has previously worked on birds and large mammals before moving onto humans.  After a spell looking for susceptibility genes to colorectal cancer, he is currently running the “People of the British Isles” project at Oxford, which is funded by the Wellcome Trust.  This work will form the basis of his talk.

with Bruce Winney
     
4:15PM -
5:00PM
 
Moving From Amateur to Professional Genealogist – Are You Ready?

Many professional genealogists started out doing their own family history research. After some years of research  experience, many amateur genealogists decide to make the move to becoming a professional. This lecture will examine the ethics which a genealogist must subscribe to before setting up in business. The various paths to becoming a professional will be explored including courses, certification and mentoring. 

 
Suggestions for self-development will be offered and professional standards will be discussed. Simply getting paid does not a professional genealogist make. 
 
Moving From Amateur to Professional Genealogist – Are You Ready?
Eileen M. Ó Dúill

Eileen O Duill, is a Certified Genealogist, specializing  in probate genealogical research in Ireland. She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland and is Trustee for Britain and Ireland of the Association of Professional Genealogists of the U.S.A., 2007-2012.  Eileen has lectured at conferences in Ireland, the U.K. and the USA since 1999.  She is a course tutor and lecturer on the Diploma in Family History (Genealogy) offered by the Independent College in Dublin.  In March 2011, Eileen teamed with Lou Szucs to  provide a webinar on Irish genealogy for Ancestry.com.

with Eileen M. Ó Dúill
British Empire sources for family history

Takes a look at sources useful for the family history of those living in the British Empire (excluding Canada, Australia and New Zealand). These include generic sources with relevance to many parts of the Empire held in the UK and those held in the colonies themselves. Areas covered will include Africa, the Caribbean/West Indies and South Asia. Africa has received little attention in this regard and it is hoped to begin to fill a gap in general awareness of what is available.

British Empire sources for family history
Graham S Holton

Graham has been involved in one way or another with genealogy and family history for most of his life. After long experience as a librarian, his involvement in the field of teaching family history began as a tutor of evening classes at the University of Strathclyde. He has been a tutor on the University’s Postgraduate Programme in Genealogical Studies since it commenced in 2007 and is now Principal Tutor. He is author of Discover your Scottish ancestry (2nd ed. 2009) and My ancestor emigrated to the British Empire (forthcoming).

with Graham S Holton
The National Archives: Civil Servants and the First World War

It can be difficult to research ancestors who were civil servants, and many records have not been preserved at all. Despite this, a surprising amount can be found about government employees during the First World War. Files in The National Archives describe how government services managed the demands of wartime: not only replacing staff who joined the armed forces, but often dealing with increased workloads too. These fascinating records cover many aspects of life on the home front, and best of all, are full of names and details of men who enlisted, and men and women who stayed behind.

The National Archives: Civil Servants and the First World War
Audrey Collins

Audrey Collins is a family history specialist at The National Archives. She graduated in history and politics from the University of Warwick, and was a freelance researcher, speaker, teacher and writer on family history before joining The National Archives in 2002. She is a regular speaker at events and conferences in the UK and worldwide, and is the co-author of 'Birth, Marriage and Death Records, a guide for family historians' with Dave Annal. Her specialist research interests include the history and development of the General Register Office for England and Wales, and the people who worked there.

with Audrey Collins
4:45PM -
5:30PM
Beginner
Why can’t I find them in the Civil Registration Indexes?

It can be totally frustrating to have a name that you cannot find in the Civil Registration Indexes for England and Wales.

This lecture will explore the process that was used to create the indexes as well as showing by examples and the use of other sites how you can the missing ones.
 
Why can’t I find them in the Civil Registration Indexes?
John Hanson

John was a Systems Specialist in the banking industry before taking early retirement in 2001. He has been researching his family history for the past 30 years and has used computers and the Internet for his research since their early days. His speciality is the census is the author of “Getting the best from the 1911 census”

He now writes, lectures and teaches family history and was made a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists in 2005 for “Services to Genealogy”.
with John Hanson
     

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