Getting the Most from Family Historian Charts & Diagrams

10:15 - 11:00

Learn how to unleash the power of Family Historian diagrams to explore and show off your family tree in ways you never knew were possible.  Topics covered include: tips for creating great-looking charts; using diagrams interactively for browsing, editing and exploring; configuring ‘text schemes’ to show whatever information you want; manipulating ‘smart trees’; finding new ways to present information visually by configuring box shape and appearance; colouring branch lines and ‘routes’; working with multiple trees; scaling and printing.

Surnames and Family History

16:15 - 17:00

Surnames are an essential part of our family history but just how much do you really know about your name and where it comes from and just how accurate are surname dictionaries? Celia Heritage looks at the evolution of surnames and how to interpret them as well as showing how they may hinder as well as help you in your research.

Accessibility: 
Signed

Researching Your Ancestors Before Civil Registration

15:15 - 16:00

With increased digitisation of genealogical records in England and Wales, documents relating to your ancestors are far more readily available but how are the records structured? Where are they located? And what information can be gleaned from these primary sources?

Taking you through the basics by examining various record sets in the parish chest, Kirsty Gray highlights the online and offline resources available to today’s genealogist when researching before 1837 in England and Wales.

Accessibility: 
Signed

Incarceration and Insanity: Researching nineteenth century lunatic ancestors

14:15 - 15:00

This presentation examines nineteenth century asylums and the records that are available to assist in researching ‘lunatic ancestors’. 

Accessibility: 
Signed

TBC

13:15 - 14:00

“In Their Own Write”: Victorian Pauper Letters

12:15 - 13:00

While most archival material relating to 19th century poverty was written either by the elites who legislated on the matter or the administrators who managed poverty at a local level, pauper letters offer a rare insight into the experience of poverty as written by the poor themselves.

Accessibility: 
Signed

Identifying the Missing of WWI

11:15 - 12:00

Over 330,000 Allied soldiers from WWI are still missing-in-action, lying somewhere on the Western Front. Every year 30-60 of these soldiers are discovered during routine farming activities or road widening schemes. In the past, such soldiers were rarely identified, but with advances in DNA testing, identification is now possible and more frequent. This presentation gives an overview of the identification process using examples from recent discoveries (e.g. Fromelles).

How can the National Records of Scotland Help me with my Ancestry Research?

10:15 - 11:00

With a huge range of Scottish records available to research, what are the top records, what will they tell you, and how do you start digging in National Records of Scotland? In addition to the wealth of documents searchable through ScotlandsPeople, there are plenty more in Scotland’s national archives to help your ancestral search: parish records, civil and criminal court cases, tax rolls, property records,  military records and estate archives.

In Pursuit of Lot’s! Using Forenames to Build the Family Tree

16:15 - 17:00

All too often I have accepted the given names without much thought about the choice of those names. In this talk I will demonstrate how paying more attention to the usual and unusual naming patterns within the family can:
- provide a shortcut to tracking individual families within the ancestral family
- demonstrate migration patterns of both the ancestral and the collateral family within the UK and globally
- evidence a link to a significant family event that triggered the introduction of the unusual surname

Accessibility: 
Signed

Waacs, Wrens and Penguins: Non-Nursing Women serving with the Armed Forces from 1917

15:15 - 16:00

2017 marks the centenary of women serving in the military forces (in a non-nursing capacity). This workshop examines the WAAC, WRNS and WRAF; their service in two world wars through to integrated service today, and points you to the resources to research them