The Y-DNA and mtDNA landscape of Britain and Western Europe

13:15 - 14:15

The paternally-inherited Y chromosome and maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been widely used in population genetic studies and also in genealogical research. I will describe the background to the use of these markers in studies of Western Europe in general, and the British Isles in particular.

The Y-DNA and mtDNA landscape of Britain and Europe

13:15 - 14:15

The paternally-inherited Y chromosome and maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been widely used in population genetic studies and also in genealogical research. I will describe the background to the use of these markers in studies of Western Europe in general, and the British Isles in particular.

Discovering Richard III

13:15 - 14:15

Turi King will tell the story of the research project undertaken at the University of Leicester to discover the burial place of Richard III and the related work to scientifically identify the skeletal remains which were discovered. The lecture will outline the underlying archaeological work leading up to the discovery of the skeletal remains, the DNA analysis and genealogical research carried out in parallel to help identify the skeleton, and the statistical analysis of the evidence.

Tips and Tricks for Using FamilySearch.org

16:15 - 17:00

FamilySearch.org is the largest FREE genealogical website in the world. With over 5 billion original records, online books and research helps, there are many ways and reasons FamilySearch.org can help with finding ancestors.

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Going back in time: free resources for finding people, 13th to 18th centuries

15:15 - 16:00

Many resources with hundreds of personal names and details are now available in print and on free websites. The trick is to know what they are, where to find them and how to use them!

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Tracing women ancestors before 1837

14:15 - 15:00

Too often neglected from family trees the women in your family deserve to be noted. This talk will look at sources which are particularly useful for namimg and identifying women and what they did in their lives.

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TBC

13:15 - 14:00

Bridging the Gap – Tracing forwards from 1911

12:15 - 13:00

Once ancestors can be found in the 1911 census it becomes easier to roll them backwards and trace their families.  However open records in the period between us and 1911 don’t always overlap and cross-reference so easily as census and certificates do.  This talk will highlight what records are available, the surprising nature of what can be found and how to extend every piece of the jigsaw to bridge the gap.

Turn your family tree surprises into a book

11:15 - 12:00

Everyone will find surprises in their family trees: illegitimate babies, drunks, bigamists - and possibly poisoners. Helen Barrell will explain how she pieced together some alarming discoveries from her own research, and turned it into a Victorian true crime book. She will take you through historical records that will expand your research and enrich your story, and will suggest ways to share your writing, via websites, blogs, self-publishing, and traditional print media

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