What are the chances? The science of inheritance, genes and cancer

11:15 - 12:00

Cancer is a phenomenally complex disease that touches all our lives. But what is it? How does family history affect it? And, more importantly, how can you reduce your risk? Cancer Research UK is the world’s largest independent organisation dedicated to using research to beat cancer. We have helped to uncover the role that our genes play in cancer and developed vital cancer treatments. Our research experts will host this open discussion of the role our genes play in causing cancer, the choices that can affect cancer risk, and also busting some of the myths surrounding cancer.

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Total Genealogy

10:15 - 11:00

Total football required every player to be able to play in any position.  That kind of flexibility and all round expertise is needed in a similar way to really flesh out any pedigree – total genealogy.  This talk looks over the range of sources and techniques necessary when creating a total family picture.  The talk will be illustrated by showing how this has been done for one family to create a complete history spanning 500 years, and how that piece of total genealogy is now being openly shared. 

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Surnames and Family History

16:15 - 17:00

Surnames are an essential part of our family history but just how much do you really know about your name and where it comes from and just how accurate are surname dictionaries? Celia Heritage looks at the evolution of surnames and how to interpret them as well as showing how they may hinder as well as help you in your research.

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Researching Your Ancestors Before Civil Registration

15:15 - 16:00

With increased digitisation of genealogical records in England and Wales, documents relating to your ancestors are far more readily available but how are the records structured? Where are they located? And what information can be gleaned from these primary sources?

Taking you through the basics by examining various record sets in the parish chest, Kirsty Gray highlights the online and offline resources available to today’s genealogist when researching before 1837 in England and Wales.

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Incarceration and Insanity: Researching nineteenth century lunatic ancestors

14:15 - 15:00

This presentation examines nineteenth century asylums and the records that are available to assist in researching ‘lunatic ancestors’. 

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TBC

13:15 - 14:00

“In Their Own Write”: Victorian Pauper Letters

12:15 - 13:00

While most archival material relating to 19th century poverty was written either by the elites who legislated on the matter or the administrators who managed poverty at a local level, pauper letters offer a rare insight into the experience of poverty as written by the poor themselves.

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Identifying the Missing of WWI

11:15 - 12:00

Over 330,000 Allied soldiers from WWI are still missing-in-action, lying somewhere on the Western Front. Every year 30-60 of these soldiers are discovered during routine farming activities or road widening schemes. In the past, such soldiers were rarely identified, but with advances in DNA testing, identification is now possible and more frequent. This presentation gives an overview of the identification process using examples from recent discoveries (e.g. Fromelles).

How can the National Records of Scotland Help me with my Ancestry Research?

10:15 - 11:00

With a huge range of Scottish records available to research, what are the top records, what will they tell you, and how do you start digging in National Records of Scotland? In addition to the wealth of documents searchable through ScotlandsPeople, there are plenty more in Scotland’s national archives to help your ancestral search: parish records, civil and criminal court cases, tax rolls, property records,  military records and estate archives.

Outside the Law? Illegitimacy 1700-1987

16:15 - 17:00

This talk explains the concepts of legitimacy and legitimation and the legal and social implications for children born outside marriage. It shows what family historians can expect to find recorded in parish or civil records, and – drawing on large-scale cohort studies – what inferences can be drawn from what is or is not recorded.  

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