Baptism, Marriage & Burial Records in British India – Not available in the “India Office Records"

11:15 - 12:00

Researchers of ancestors who were baptized/born, married or died in British India (1600-1947) are often disappointed that they are unable to find them in the ‘official’ records held in the British Library. BL indicates that they hold about 70 pct. of such records but where are the remaining 30 pct?

Peter Bailey has assembled a large number of sources of these “missing’ records and will explain the many ways in which they can be found and accessed.

Contemptible Little PoWs - the BEF incarcerated in 1914

10:15 - 11:00

The British Expeditionary Force sustained huge casualties in 1914 but what is often not fully understood is just how many of these men became prisoners of war. Using contemporary accounts and drawing on his own extensive knowledge and personal archive of the men of 1914, Paul Nixon will outline both the fate of the BEF and give pointers on how to research your own First World War prisoner of war.

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Tips and Tricks for Using FamilySearch.org

16:15 - 17:00

FamilySearch.org is the largest FREE genealogical website in the world. With over 5 billion original records, online books and research helps, there are many ways and reasons FamilySearch.org can help with finding ancestors.

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Going back in time: free resources for finding people, 13th to 18th centuries

15:15 - 16:00

Many resources with hundreds of personal names and details are now available in print and on free websites. The trick is to know what they are, where to find them and how to use them!

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Tracing women ancestors before 1837

14:15 - 15:00

Too often neglected from family trees the women in your family deserve to be noted. This talk will look at sources which are particularly useful for namimg and identifying women and what they did in their lives.

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TBC

13:15 - 14:00

Bridging the Gap – Tracing forwards from 1911

12:15 - 13:00

Once ancestors can be found in the 1911 census it becomes easier to roll them backwards and trace their families.  However open records in the period between us and 1911 don’t always overlap and cross-reference so easily as census and certificates do.  This talk will highlight what records are available, the surprising nature of what can be found and how to extend every piece of the jigsaw to bridge the gap.

Turn your family tree surprises into a book

11:15 - 12:00

Everyone will find surprises in their family trees: illegitimate babies, drunks, bigamists - and possibly poisoners. Helen Barrell will explain how she pieced together some alarming discoveries from her own research, and turned it into a Victorian true crime book. She will take you through historical records that will expand your research and enrich your story, and will suggest ways to share your writing, via websites, blogs, self-publishing, and traditional print media

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Getting the Most from Family Historian Charts & Diagrams

10:15 - 11:00

Learn how to unleash the power of Family Historian diagrams to explore and show off your family tree in ways you never knew were possible.  Topics covered include: tips for creating great-looking charts; using diagrams interactively for browsing, editing and exploring; configuring ‘text schemes’ to show whatever information you want; manipulating ‘smart trees’; finding new ways to present information visually by configuring box shape and appearance; colouring branch lines and ‘routes’; working with multiple trees; scaling and printing.

How to Spot a Nonconformist

16:15 - 17:00

Our ancestors disappear from the Anglican parish registers in alarming regularity because they choose to worship elsewhere.   How can you spot a nonconformist? What clues do they leave behind? The presentation provides examples of clues a nonconformist will drop and explains how to conduct effective research into a particular nonconformist faith.

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