Debbie Kennett, Honorary Research Associate, UCL

Debbie is an avid genealogist who has been researching her family tree for over a decade. She has written two books for the History Press: DNA and Social Networking (2011) and The Surnames Handbook (2012). Debbie is an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London. She is a member of ISOGG and the co-founder of the ISOGG Wiki. She runs the Cruwys/Cruse/Cruise one-name study through the Guild of One-Name Studies, and is the administrator of the associated surname project at Family Tree DNA.

Alasdair Macdonald, University of Strathclyde

Alasdair has been involved in family history research since his late teens and has a particular interest in the Scottish Highlands. He completed his MSc on Scottish baronies in 2011 and is a Research Fellow in the Centre for Lifelong Learning, University of Strathclyde. His research interests focus on the use of DNA in genealogical research and he is currently researching the origin and linkage of male lineages in the British Isles using Y-chromosomal DNA. He also specializes in Scottish land records and palaeography.

Dr Maurice Gleeson, MB

Maurice is a psychiatrist, a pharmaceutical physician, & a genetic genealogist. He did his first DNA test in 2008 and since then has used DNA to good effect in his own family tree research, finding relatives in Australia whose ancestors had left Ireland in 1886, and tracing one line of his family back to the 1600's in Limerick.

Dr Peter Jones

Peter Jones is an independent biotechnology consultant to a variety of biotechnology companies globally. He has a BSc and MSc from University of St Andrews and a PhD whilst working at the LMB, Cambridge. His PhD was part of the foundations of the Human Genome Programme. He moved into commercial biotechnology having developed new methods for the purification of DNA from difficult and forensic samples. This led onto work on ancient DNA, as well as stints in IP and business development.

Sue Honoré

Sue researches intergenerational work issues for a day job. In her ‘spare’ time she is Editor of the Oxfordshire Family History Society journal, co-administrator with Richard Merry of the Oxfordshire DNA Project at Family Tree DNA, runs a one-place study project for her village of Minster Lovell and advises people on family history research. Her ancestors come from northern Britain but tend to have moved across the globe, providing excellent experience in trying to trace them. Sue has an Advanced Diploma in Local History from the University of Oxford.

Linda Kerr, Genealogist and Archive Researcher

Linda is a professional genealogist specialising in Scottish family history research especially for those whose ancestors come from Glasgow and the west of Scotland. She has explored DNA for her own family history and feels passionately that beginners need basic information about DNA itself in order to make best use of the test options.

Debbie Kennett, Honorary Research Associate, UCL

Debbie is an avid genealogist who has been researching her family tree for over a decade. She has written two books for the History Press: DNA and Social Networking (2011) and The Surnames Handbook (2012). Debbie is an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London. She is a member of ISOGG and the co-founder of the ISOGG Wiki. She runs the Cruwys/Cruse/Cruise one-name study through the Guild of One-Name Studies, and is the administrator of the associated surname project at Family Tree DNA.

Katherine Borges, Director of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy

Katherine Borges, Director of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy. I am a member of Southern California Genealogical Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, and Colonial Dames of the XVII Century, Director of ISOGG, and President of the Salida Chamber of Commerce. I co-founded and became Director of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), which promotes and educates about genetic genealogy to over 8,000 members in 70 countries.

Cathy Swift, M.Phil (Dunelm), D.Phil (Oxon.), M.Phil (Dublin)

Cathy runs the Irish Studies teaching programme in Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick. She has an MPhil in Archaeology from the University of Durham and a second MPhil in Old-Irish Language and Culture from Trinity College Dublin. Her DPhil at Oxford examined the history of the cult of St Patrick. She has taught in many universities, served ten years as organising Secretary of the Irish Conference of Mediaevalists, and runs summer schools in Old Irish in Limerick when she is not off gallivanting across Europe with her pilgrim staff, knapsack and tent.

John Cleary, university lecturer and Cromwell's Scottish prisoner tracing project coordinator.

John is a lecturer at a university in Edinburgh and a member of ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy). He gives talks on using DNA in family history research in Scotland, and is interested in how genetic genealogy can help to understand the origins and spread of surnames. He is involved in a project researching the fate of Scottish prisoners captured by Cromwell in the Civil War and transported to the Americas, working with the Prisoners’ descendants using DNA and genealogy to discover more about their fate.