The British India Army in World War 1

12:15 - 13:00

The second largest army in the British Empire in 1914 was that of British India. It supported the Allies in all theatres, Western Front, Egypt-Palestine, Gallipoli, East Africa and, particularly, in Mesopotamia. Peter will focus his talk on the operations in Mesopotamia and subsequent operations in Persia. He will describe the Nature of the Indian Army of the time, together with the records of the Europeans and Indians who led the army though to participate in the defeat of the Ottoman Empire.

Experience Level: 
Beginner

Scottish Baptismal Names; understanding the role of baptismal names, name variants and spelling variations in Scottish Records. How can these help (or hinder) your research?

13:15 - 14:00

Baptismal name variants are the cause of frequent confusion when searching for ancestors - the name used in a late 19th century census

The Letter of the Law: legislation for family historians

14:15 - 15:00

The records which we use to research our family history are largely the result of a variety of Acts of Parliament. A good understanding of the legislation behind the census returns, parish registers and civil registration records (and many more) can make an enormous difference when it comes to interpreting the information left behind by our ancestors. This talk will look at the major pieces of legislation from Thomas Cromwell

Accessibility: 
Signed

The Psychology of Brick Walls

15:15 - 16:00

Everyone has them-an end point in their family history which seems impossible to break through no matter how many experts are asked and sources are searched. What are the different types of blockages we encounter? Does every type of blockage have a solution? How can we improve our chances of success through better research skills? To what extent is our mindset an issue in the search? Is it ever advisable to abandon the search? Come to the talk and prepare to leave unsettled, but wiser.

AncestryDNA – a new revolution in family history research

14:15 - 15:00

Join Brad Argent from Ancestry as he explores the results of his AncestryDNA test, explains how this groundbreaking genetic test works and discusses how DNA can revolutionise your family history research and connect you with living relatives today.

Birmingham Coroners' Records

10:15 - 11:00

Despite their grim contents Coroners’ Inquest documents can provide a real insight into the everyday lives of our ancestors and their families. Discover, through examples from the rich collection of Birmingham Archives, how these records can allow our relatives to come to life through the statements and evidence of family members, neighbours or workmates. Whether the verdict was Act of God, accidental death, murder or suicide the background details tell us as much about the deceased’s life as they reveal about their death.

Place of Birth Ireland: How do find out more?

13:15 - 14:00

Over the centuries, one of Ireland’s greatest exports has been its people.  This has taken many guises be it voluntarily to travel the world, to explore seeking fame and fortune, economic migrants, trade, colonise, govern or forcibly transported, to fight or to garrison some far off settlement.   It is estimated that there are over one million people of Irish birth in Britain today, plus numerous second, third or fourth generation Irish.

Experience Level: 
Beginner

Researching your Jewish Ancestors

14:15 - 15:00

This lecture will cover the main sources of material that can be used to research Jewish families in the UK. Special emphasis will be given to records specific to Jewish research as well as other materials of more general interest to immigrant families. Some guidance will be given on extending your research into countries in Central and Eastern Europe as well as Holocaust materials. The special challenges of Jewish naming conventions and Border changes will also be considered.

Experience Level: 
Beginner

How Far Did Your Ancestor Travel Before the Railways?

15:15 - 16:00

The advent of affordable rail travel in the mid-nineteenth century meant migration within the UK increased significantly among our ancestors. But just how far and how frequently did they travel before this and could this migration be the root cause of many researchers hitting so many brick walls in their research?

Experience Level: 
Beginner

Surrey in the Great War - Sources, History and Remembrance

16:15 - 17:00

Was your ancestor in Surrey during the Great War? Did they serve in a Surrey regiment or are they recorded on a Surrey memorial? This talk will explore the wide range of Great War resources available at Surrey History Centre. It will also provide an overview of how Surrey was affected by the conflict and the impact the county had on the wider war effort. The talk will also show how the county is remembering the men and women who were caught up in the war, both at the Front and at home.

Experience Level: 
Beginner